Fishing the Pelagic Rich Pacific with Guy Harvey Outpost

March 9, 2016 at 2:10 am | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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black-marlin-pinas-bayBy Sue Cocking, Guy Harvey Outpost staff writer

scocking@guyharveyoutpost.com

Steve Schniedman, experienced Florida offshore fisherman, has traveled the world, catching and releasing blue, white, and striped marlin.  But the fourth element of the superfecta– black marlin– eluded him until recently when he visited the pelagic-rich Pacific waters off Panama with several members of the Guy Harvey Outpost Resorts team.

Fishing aboard a 66-foot Buddy Davis yacht piloted by the crew of Panama Yacht and Fishing Charters– a Guy Harvey Outpost Expedition outfitter– Schniedman hooked a black estimated at between 300 and 400 pounds using a small live tuna for bait.

“It was the fight of a lifetime– a crazy fight,” Schniedman said.  “He took a lot of line.  We were full-throttle backing down just to keep up with him.  He jumped five or six times.”

Schniedman had his hands full– literally–fighting the huge billfish on 50-pound tackle, but he eventually reeled it close enough for the crew to unhook and release it.

“The best trip I’ve ever been on,” he said afterward.

Not only was the fishing spectacular, according to Schniedman, but the experience of living aboard a 98-foot luxury Knight and Carver mother ship was first-rate.

PanamaBoat

“The mother ship we lived on was absolutely beautiful,” he said. “The crew, the food, the chef–everything was five-star.  I’d certainly go down and fish on that boat again.”

A typical day involved waking early, catching live bonitos and skipjacks along the Zane Grey Reef, then trolling the livies along the reef for the blacks.  When the sun grew warmer, the crew headed to the deeper offshore waters of the Hannibal Bank.  At sundown, the boat made another pass along the reef before returning to the mother ship– “a floating luxury lodge”, according to GHO president Mark Ellert.

In addition to Schniedman’s black marlin, the GHO party of  Ellert, sportfishing director Cliff Jensen, and their friend Phil Schoonover caught numerous huge dolphin fish, or mahi.  Jensen caught his first-ever dog-toothed tuna.  Schoonover caught and released several trevally up to 15 pounds on fly rod.

The fishing wasn’t the only draw, according to the group.  One evening, the mother ship was visited by a party of villagers in dug-out canoes laden with handmade arts and crafts.

“A virtual shopping center,” Ellert marveled, adding that everyone bought some treasures to take home.

While the black marlin season is winding down along Panama’s Pacific coast, spring and summer present bountiful opportunities for catching large yellowfin tuna and Cubera snapper. To book your adventure, visit http://bit.ly/1PJkI2b or call Jensen at 954-243-1178 or email cjensen@guyharveyoutpost.com.

Better hurry up or Schniedman might elbow you out of the way.

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Sue Cocking chronicles the Guy Harvey Outpost travel and adventure experience in regular blog posts on GuyHarveyOutpostNews.com/.  For 21 years, Cocking covered the full spectrum of outdoors adventure opportunities in South Florida and beyond for the Miami Herald, including fishing, diving, hunting, paddling camping, sailing and powerboat racing.  She is a certified scuba diver and holder of an IGFA women’s world fly fishing record for a 29-pound permit. 

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Share your photos, videos and experiences with Guy Harvey Outpost by hash tagging #OutpostAttitude to all of your social media posts.

Thinking Outside the (Live) Bait Box for Sailfish

February 4, 2016 at 6:27 pm | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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1916104_202726822733_7371996_nBy Sue Cocking, Guy Harvey Outpost Staff Writer

scocking@guyharveyoutpost.com

Miami-based charter fishing captain extraordinaire Ray Rosher —  a Guy Harvey Outpost Outfitter–didn’t reach the top of the industry by following the leads of others.  Rosher– whose teams have won top honors in just about every billfish tournament circuit from South Florida to the Bahamas, to the Caribbean and beyond–is an innovator who’s not afraid to try something unorthodox to reign atop the fleet.

“Don’t be afraid to try new techniques,” he advised.  “I’ve had more success doing things a little unconventional.”

With sailfish season hitting its stride along the Florida east coast and Keys, captains and anglers might want to consider changing things up from their usual practices.

For example, Rosher says, many fishermen believe that the only consistent method of catching and releasing sailfish between Miami and Jupiter is to drift waters with a drastic color change– usually 80 to 200 feet deep– using live bait on kites– typically goggle eyes (big-eye scad); threadfin herring; or sardines.

But Rosher said winning tournaments in the Pacific waters of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico taught him a thing or two about the effectiveness of dead-baiting.

Trolling a dead bally hoo on a spinning outfit behind a Mylar dredge, Rosher has enjoyed days of multiple hook-ups amid a fleet of live-baiters off Miami.

“That stuff about ‘they won’t eat dead bait when there’s live bait around’ is baloney,” he said.  “Don’t get pigeonholed thinking you have to catch sailfish in Miami on a live bait.”

Referring to his dredge/dead bait set-up, Rosher said, “I don’t care what [sailfish] think it is when they’re five feet away.  It’s too late; he’s got a bait swimming by him and he eats it.”

The captain points out that live baiting for sailfish generally works well between Jupiter and Miami because of steeper, narrower bottom contours that funnel the fish through predictable corridors as they feed into the northbound Gulf Stream current.  In the Stuart-Fort Pierce area, he said, trolling dead baits is preferable because the gradually-sloping bottom necessitates covering lots of ground to locate fish.

In the Keys where waters tend to be clearer and calmer and currents less consistent, fishermen look for showers of bally hoo being harassed by sailfish near shallow reefs such as Conch Reef and American Shoal.

“Fish that might be out in 100 feet of water come into the reef to feed,” Rosher said.

The 2015-16 sailfish season has been a roller coaster ride so far, ranging from days where it’s difficult to get a bite to double-digit releases.  The onset of cold fronts to the north usually propels pods of sailfish south.

And if this year is anything like past sailfish seasons, Rosher predicts a consistent push of fish into South Florida and the Keys well into May.

BOOK YOUR OWN SAILFISH CHARTERS with Guy Harvey Outpost Outfitter Capt. Ray Rosher by calling GHO Reservations at 800.513.5257, or email sales@guyharveyoutpost.com.

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Sue Cocking chronicles the Guy Harvey Outpost travel and adventure experience in regular blog posts on GuyHarveyOutpostNews.com/.  For 21 years, Cocking covered the full spectrum of outdoors adventure opportunities in South Florida and beyond for the Miami Herald, including fishing, diving, hunting, paddling, camping, sailing and powerboat racing.  She is a certified scuba diver and holder of an IGFA women’s world fly fishing record for a 29-pound permit. 

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  Share your photos, videos and experiences with Guy Harvey Outpost by hash tagging #OutpostAttitude to all of your social media posts.

Help Save Bluefin Tuna

October 25, 2013 at 4:21 pm | Posted in Conservation, Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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IGFA Call to Action

Please take 30 seconds to sign this petition today and help end the waste of bluefin tuna in the U.S. and ensure that surface longlingers, not recreational fishermen, are held accountable for incidental bycatch.Sign Today!

Surface longlines kill thousands of hard-fighting game fish, including white marlin, sailfish, and bluefin tuna. In 2012, the fishery threw back dead nearly 25% of the U.S. bluefin quota. Please join us in calling on NOAA Fisheries to implement strong measures that will protect spawning bluefin in the Gulf of Mexico and reduce unwanted catch off North Carolina, hold surface longliners accountable for bluefin bycatch, maintain current bluefin quota allocations, and promote increased fishing opportunities for recreational anglers.

It takes less than a minute to sign on your support and help protect this iconic species. Want to make a bigger impact? Check the box to share your signature on Facebook and help us reach 25,000 supporters today!

The International Game Fish Association
300 Gulf Stream Way, Dania Beach, Florida, 33004 USA
www.igfa.org | 954-927-2628 | hq@igfa.org

 

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